Fed


My two most recent “tangible truths from a radical Jesus” posts have been about 2 different storms that the disciples were in, and Jesus demonstrating miraculous power in each situation.  In the first story, the disciples were more terrified after Jesus calmed the storm than during the storm itself. In the second one, when He walked to them on the water, after all was settled, the Biblical account tells us that they worshipped Him. So what happened in the meantime to change their response to Him.

The answer is a lot of things. The disciples had spent time traveling the region. In the accounts from Luke 9 and Mark 6. The disciples are returning from their time, ready to report to Jesus all that they had seen and experienced. It promises to be a sweet time for them.

But the people knew about Jesus and His disciples. The people flocked to Him. He has compassion on them and begins teaching. The teaching continues late into the afternoon. Some of the disciples, who know the area pretty well, approach Jesus and suggest that He wrap things up so they can go to the farms and villages to get some food.

Then Jesus again catches them off guard with a seemingly crazy statement: You feed them! (Mark 6.37). The disciples scoff at this suggestion – It will cost too much (John 6.7) Phillip answered.

What do you have? Jesus asked. Andrew shares that there is a boy that brought a small lunch with him – 5 small loaves of bread and 2 small fish. They don’t think that won’t go very far (vs 9).

Jesus gives them instructions to have everyone group up and sit down. He thanks God for the food and begins to pass it out. And ALL ARE SATISFIED! (vs 11).

After all have eaten their fill, the leftovers are collected and there are 12 baskets full. He sends them ahead in their boats and goes to spend some time in prayer. It is here that the storm arises and He walks to them on the water.

This is a familiar story – the only miracle of Jesus other than His resurrection that appears in all 4 gospel accounts. And it is a story that I know well from my childhood in church. But when I read the story as an adult, there were a couple of things that really caught my attention. These are the points that I want to share with you now.

1- How quickly we turn from faith to doubt – The disciples has just had this incredible time of going around the region healing sick people, casting out demons and sharing the Kingdom of God with others. (Mark 6. 7-13). They had experienced His work through them. They were ready to report their stories to Him when the crowd came and changed the course of the afternoon. And yet there, surrounded by people that needed food, they no longer leaned on the authority God had given them, they stopped looking for miraculous and started looking at practical. How quickly we do the same. We have a great experience where God shows himself in seemingly impossible ways and a moment later, we are reminding God of all the things that cannot be done or that His plan doesn’t seem practical. Oh how I long for a faith that sees the possibility instead of the impossibility. God help me see Your way first!

2- Jesus’ math lesson – I love Jesus’ math lesson in this story. 12 baskets of leftovers and 12 disciples collecting those leftovers. Each one is given a chance to process their doubt and God’s miraculous provision. He again proves Himself to them – complete authority and miraculous abilities. As they kneel to pick up each leftover scrap, I imagine them contemplating Jesus’ power to meet the needs of the masses. With their experiences traveling the region, this miraculous meal for the crowds and the impending storm where He walks to them on water, they are starting to put the puzzle pieces together. It makes sense, in the moment where Jesus again deals with the storm and with the disciples, that they turn to worship. I pray that in my own shoddy, short-sighted concept of who Jesus is, that I will also turn to worship Him even when I don’t understand how He is working.

3- Learning from the boy –  John 6 shares that it was a young boy who brought the lunch that was shared among the 5,000 men (not counting women and children). I really appreciate this lesson too. The lunch he brought did not look like very much. The disciples doubted that it would be useful. But Jesus turns it into something miraculous. What can we learn from the boy? We can strive to be like him. We can say “Here is what I have – it may not look like much but it is yours! Take it and use it however you wish”.  Jesus wants us to echo those thoughts with our own life and all the things that He has given us. All of our resources, our talents and gifts. He desires to use each of them in miraculous ways, for His purposes if we will allow Him to. Like this boy, let’s hold nothing back and offer God all that we have. He CAN use us in miraculous ways!

Come


A week or so ago, I wrote a post in the “Tangible Truths from a Radical Jesus” series about Jesus calming to storm. Today, I’m going to write about another radical thing that Jesus said in the midst of another storm, and dig into the truth that we can take from it.

If you are counting at home, this makes 2 stormy boat trips for the disciples that are mentioned in the Bible. Let’s look at this second one.

Jesus had had a long day of teaching on the heels of news that John the Baptist had been killed. He sends out the disciples ahead of him. Evening comes and the disciples’ boat is “a long way from the land” (Matthew 14.24). A storm has risen. There are experienced fishermen on board so the storm was significant enough that again, they struggled.

Jesus goes to join them, walking on the water. Growing up as a regular church attendee, I admit that it has become easy to read those words, as plainly as they appear in the text and miss out on the shock that they should convey. Jesus was WALKING ON THE WATER! In the middle of the stormy night and blowing wind and crashing waves, there is this figure floating across the water toward the disciples. Verse 26 tells us that they thought it was a ghost. That is likely because the idea that it was Jesus out for a stroll on the stormy swells made less sense than a ghost walking towards them. Maybe I am overstating the point a little but I don’t want the shock of what they were witnessing to get lost. This man was walking on top of the waves that were sinking their boats. They already were in a state of panic, and this ghostly conclusion seemed the most plausible to them. You know why? Because human beings cannot walk on water! Yet there was Jesus -fully human and fully God, doing the impossible yet again.

Jesus senses their panic, and tells them “Don’t be afraid”.  That didn’t work. They were already terrified.  Now Peter, who has a reputation of speaking and acting before really thinking things through says “If it is you, tell me to come to you on the water.” And Jesus answers “Come”. Now if I am Peter, I hear that and immediately think to myself, “Ummm, OK, just checking! I’ll wait until you get to the boat”.  But Peter does it. He steps out of the boat and “came to Jesus” (vs 29). Verse 30 tells us that he saw the wind and began to sink. He calls out to Jesus and Jesus saves him. And they get back in the boat. The storm stops and the disciples, recognizing Jesus as the Son of God,  worship Him.

There is a lot to unpack here. Here are my takeaways.

1- A Change of Heart – If you remember the last time when Jesus calmed the storm, the disciples were even more afraid than before. This time, when Jesus miraculously saves the day, they are not more afraid, they are instead moved to worship Him and recognize who Jesus is. So what changed? We will dig into that a little more next time, but for now, let’s rest on the truth that they have spent more time with Him and learned more about their purpose. The challenge for us is to do the same. As we spend more time with God and recognize the amazing things that He does over and over again, we will understand more that He is the Son of God and worthy of our worship and devotion.

2- With God, We can do impossible things – Jesus, Son of God, miracle worker, walked on the water and calmed the storm. That is amazing and miraculous on its own, but let’s not miss the other miracle in the story. Peter – fully human, and fully not-God also walked on the water – for a moment at least. He left the safer danger of the sinking boat to the extreme danger of walking on water – which people cannot physically do and experienced God doing the impossible in him. I am challenged with this part of the story to check my level of faith in God’s ability to do impossible things in my life. Peter got out of the boat. He left the safety and comfort of the known for a moment of connection with God in the unknown and impossible. And Jesus referred to Peter’s faith as small. What does that say about the others in the boat? What does it say about my faith? Would I have climbed over the gunwale and stepped out onto the rocky sea? As mentioned above, likely not. What do we miss when we play it safe? What can God do with us if we trust Him and step out in faith?

3- Impossible – Peter began to sink. He remembered that what he was doing was not possible, and he allowed doubt to creep in. We can be guilty of the same. In the midst of seeing God do amazing things in our life, working things out in His perfect timing we can still allow doubt to creep in. The enemy is there, telling us that God is not to be trusted and that we will fail. But like Peter, even if we start to fall, God’s hand is there to catch us. And He is faithful to grow our faith as we take these steps. He will show us incredible things when we believe in His power to do impossible and this power will silence the enemy. Let’s step out of the boat!

Divided Loyalties – Jackie Slater -OL- Rams Hall of Fame & Matthew Slater – WR – New England Patriots


The Big Game is just 4 days away.

Imagine the loyalty that you would feel if you were drafted by an NFL team, and played there for the entirety of your 20-year Hall of Fame career. The team has retired your jersey number (78) and you are widely considered one of the best players to ever put on their uniform. You played with the franchise as it moved…twice. You are a key part of the history of a franchise that has been around since 1936.  You were a member of the franchise’s trip to the Super Bowl in 1979 (a loss to the Steelers). The franchise has split 2 Super Bowl appearances since then, and is making their 4th trip to the Big Game. It makes sense that with your history and connection to the franchise, you would be excited to cheer them on to victory.

 Jackie Slater played 20 seasons with the Rams. He was added to the Hall of Fame in 2001

But for Jackie Slater, despite all the deep-rooted connections to the Rams, this Sunday at Super Bowl LIII, it isn’t a cinch that he’ll be cheering for the Rams to win. You see, Jackie’s son, Matthew is a special teams ace for the New England Patriots – the Rams opponent on Sunday. And for Jackie, blood lines run as strong if not stronger that his history with the Rams.  But he sees the positive in it. He says “I can’t lose”.

Their numbers are remarkably similar despite the opposite ends of the football spectrum that they play. Jackie was a big offensive lineman, playing every snap of every game.  Matthew is officially a receiver but has caught only 1 pass and been targeted only 8 times in his 11 year career.

 Matthew Slater (#18) is a spiritual leader for the Patriots

Both have been to 7 Pro Bowls. Both have spent their entire career with the team that drafted them. They both have much sought after rings – albeit for different purposes. Matthew has 2 Super Bowl rings, Jackie has a Hall of Fame ring.

There is another thing that they have in common, too – a deep-rooted faith in God.

For Matthew, his greatest stage to share his faith has been his Super Bowl appearances (3 in a row now and 6 overall).  Check out this video from Super Bowl LI Media Day.

As for Jackie, he shared the importance of God in his life during his enshrinement speech at the NFL Hall of Fame in Canton, Ohio. He closed by talking about all the hard work, great teammates and great coaches that he played with.  “Well, you see, I know that God provided it all. The good health, the teammates, and even the driving desire to be the best, I’m thankful to my Lord and savior Jesus Christ.” 

But even more than to the fans of football at the Hall of Fame enshrinement in 2001, Jackie’s God first approach to life started on the field and at home. Matthew shares the reason he always calls heads at the coin toss to start an NFL game. “Well, I remember as a child watching my father play in LA and him going out and doing the coin toss for the Rams…He always called heads, so I asked him one time, ‘Hey, why do you do that? What’s the story behind that? I think anyone who knows my family knows faith is important to us, and for him, he was always like, ‘You know, God’s the head of my life, so I call heads’. That was something he came up with, and I’ve kind of just embraced it.”

Here are my takeaways from the Slaters’ story:

1- In the end, it’s just a game – As I get older, I see the passion that fans carry for their favorite team. I know that I can get caught up in allowing my mood to be affected by the success of my favorite teams. This can be a heart-breaking habit to form. Because generally in sports, in any year, there is only one champion – the rest of the league ultimately is disappointed with how the season ends. And the fans tend to carry the burdens of success and loyalty more strongly than the players do. If a team fails to win, change is called for. If a player should leave one team and go to another, especially if it is a rival team, hatred and boos greet the player the next time he/she is in town. We can’t allow our identity or our mood to get wrapped up in something as trivial as a sports event or else we wind up in despair more often than not.

 Jackie will cheer on his son on Sunday, but both will use the opportunity to share what God has done.

2- More Important Things – I have often written on these pages the way pro athletes use the platform of fame and success to share their faith with the world. I appreciate that so many take that opportunity. I know that the stories of Christian Athletes and their boldness to share their faith were significant in my faith journey. God used their boldness to as part of His plan to draw me back to Him. And we can take the same challenge on, too.  We may not have the media of the entire world putting a microphone in our faces and asking us about our faith, but we do have opportunities, every day, to shine the light of God’s love in the world around us. Join me in praying for those opportunities and for boldness to share our journey of faith. 

3-Like Father Like Son – I love stories like this. They challenge me to consider the legacy that I leave for my own kids. Will they see the importance of faith in my life? Will they feel comfortable to ask me why I strive to value God above all? Will they understand grace even more when they see me stumble? Will they choose the adventure that God has in store for them? I pray that the answer is “Yes”.

Storm


Recently, I wrote a two-post series on the woman who touched Jesus’ robe and the raising of Jairus’ daughter. This time around, it will be a three-post series on another set of amazing stories from the life of Jesus. In each one, there is a moment when Jesus says something radical and impossible, and yet, as we will see, what He spoke was truthful, and what we can learn from it is profound.

Mark 4. One evening, Jesus tells the disciples to cross the Sea of Galilee to the other side. A few boats set out, and Jesus, seemingly tired from a long day with the large crowd that had assembled, falls asleep on a cushion at the back of the boat.  As He sleeps, a storm comes – not uncommon on the Sea of Galilee, but this storm is fierce enough that the disciples, some of whom were experienced fishermen that have likely been through their share of storms, start to panic. Their boats are taking on water, they are afraid and in verse 38 they wake Jesus up (keep this tidbit in mind for later).  “Don’t you care that we are perishing?” they ask. Then Jesus does something quite unexpected. In verse 39: “And he awoke and rebuked the wind and said to the sea, “Peace! Be still!” And the wind ceased, and there was a great calm.”

I live in Minnesota, and I don’t like to shovel snow. Around this time of year, it turns very cold and we have the snow starts falling – everything from flurries to snow-namis. I have Jesus’ approach many times myself, stepping out onto my step, casting my eyes towards the falling flakes and saying “STOP!” And it has NEVER WORKED! My neighbors look at me like I’ve lost it. But the snow keeps falling, undeterred. Imagine, if you will, that you are on the boat, in the midst of a storm unlike any that you have ever seen before. You wake Jesus because, well, you don’t know what else to do. He gets up off his cushion, rubs his eyes for a minute, takes in a deep breath, faces the winds and rain and says “Be still!” Your initial reaction is likely similar to my neighbors when I call for the snowflakes to reverse their course.  But here is the thing.  IT WORKED! When Jesus spoke to the storm – it listened. And in a “careful-what-you-wish-for” moment, the disciples consider what they have just seen and instead of being comforted by the end of the storm, the Bible tells us that they remain afraid. Verse 41 says “And they were filled with great fear and said to one another, “Who then is this, that even the wind and the sea obey him?” (emphasis mine)

This sets the stage for another boating adventure that would occur later. That will be the topic of my next post. But for now, here are my points to ponder about this story.

1- Human – Earlier I had you take note that the disciples had to wake Jesus up in the midst of this tremendous storm. That tells me that Jesus was really tired. Tired enough that the rocking of the boat, the down pouring rain, and the harsh wind were not enough to wake him. Why is this significant? Here, Jesus shows us that He was human. He was affected by fatigue, He grew tired and needed rest. Jesus truly “became flesh” as John 1 tells us. Jesus life was filled with the same hard things that we all feel – fatigue, weariness, heartache, sorrow, temptation and more. Yet He remained perfect, sinless, and therefore able to take our place and pay our debt. This is an important piece of the story. But so is the next.

2- Divine – He also had the ability to control the weather just by speaking. It would have been amazing to witness this, but it makes sense. He was present at the beginning when God’s spoken word created everything. With His voice, He created the Sea of Galilee, the mountains, the wind currents, all the systems that affect and create the weather patterns there. They were formed at His word, it makes sense that they still obey Him. And while that kind of power inspired awe and fear among His disciples, the reality that they experienced is that He was with them in the storm and made a way out. I think this is an important consideration as well. He is with us in our storms, literal and figurative. And He is bigger, and more powerful than all of them. He called them on their fear and invited them to have faith. I think those words are intended for us as well. He is faithful and trustworthy. He can overcome all that we face. Faith in Him is worth it!

Championship Weekend Special – 4 Teams, 4 Reasons to Cheer


Championship weekend is here. I have been delinquent with my NFL posts this season, but there is no time like the present, right! Anyway, in an effort to atone, I will share part of the story of a player from each team that remains.

And I have some more lined up for the two teams that move on to the big game in a couple weeks.  So let’s dig in.

Rams WR Cooper Kupp

Los Angeles Rams – Cooper Kupp WR.

Kupp has been part of their dynamic offense since the Rams drafted him in the third round in 2017. Injury has cut this year short. He is on IR after a knee injury in week 10 and will not play in the game this weekend. In the first half of the season, he averaged over 14 yards per catch and 6 touchdowns.

Kupp is a third generation NFL player. His dad was a QB in the Early 90s and Cooper’s grandfather, Jake played in the NFL from 1964-1975 and was an original Saint (selected in the 1967 expansion draft). He is in the Saints Hall of Fame.

Cooper and his wife Anna chose to return to Eastern Washington for Cooper’s senior year. The couple chose to return to be positive influences, guiding the younger players on the team to prepare for college and making good decisions. He says “That’s one reason we came back: to have an influence on young adults in a very important time in their lives…When you see the way God impacts lives, it makes it a lot easier.

For more on his story, check out this CBN video

My takeaway from Kupp’s story:

Influence: My wife and I recently started a podcast about influence. We are reminded that influence happens naturally. We will all influence the people we are around. The question is will that influence be positive or negative. I really appreciate Cooper and Anna’s decision to be positive influencers on campus, even forgoing the NFL for a year to influence younger students at their college. It would have made sense to head to the NFL after his junior year, but after prayer and fasting, they chose instead to play one more year of college ball and intentionally use their influence to set younger students up for success. I’m challenged to remember to seek God’s leading instead of what may make the most sense to my selfish nature.

Saints QB Teddy Bridgewater

New Orleans Saints – Teddy Bridgwater QB

I am a Saints fan, but I live in suburban Minneapolis and so when the Saints traded to secure Teddy Bridgewater as a backup quarterback, I was familiar with him. He was a first round pick by the Vikings in 2014, and took over as the starting quarterback early on in the 2014 season. In 2016, after a couple of decent seasons, great things were expected of him. Instead, a horrific knee injury at practice sidelined him for that season and much of the next one. There was some question about whether he would ever be able to play again.

So what do you do when it all comes crashing down, and the things you had counted on or planned on come to a halt. For Teddy, it was important to keep strong faith in God and keep trusting that it would all work out for the best in the end. What was his perspective? “I just knew that it was in God’s hands…  I don’t know what just happened, but I know there’s someone out there who’s going through something worse than I am, so I just have to keep my faith and believe that everything’s going to be all right.'”

He also said “I never asked God why this happened to me, I’ve only told him thank you. A year later, he’s showing me why this happened to me.”

My takeaway from Bridgewater’s story:

Why? – When bad things, or hard things happen in our life, it is always tempting to ask “Why?” and try to figure out if we are being punished for something we have done. But I love the story found in John 9 where the disciples ask Jesus who is responsible for a blind man’s blindness – him or his parents. Jesus replies in verse 3 “this happened so that the works of God might be displayed in him.” Sometimes hard things happen so that when God shows up and works it out our minds are completely blown away. That is what Teddy hints at when he tweets a year exactly after the injury, he is feeling grateful for God showing him why this happened. Let’s look for how God shows up in our hard times to celebrate that the Creator of all things is active in our life! What a joy that is!

Patriots TE Dwayne Allen

New England Patriots – Dwayne Allen – TE

New England is playing in their 8th straight AFC championship game. They embody the very definition of the word “dynasty”. Dwayne Allen is in his second year with the Patriots. He has already been to one Super Bowl with them and is hoping to make it two in a row, this time with even better results. He also reached the playoffs twice in his time with the Colts who drafted him in the 3rd round of the 2012 draft.

Allen has caught only 13 passes in his 2 seasons in New England, after scoring 19 TDs on 126 passes during his tenure with the Colts. But as you can see in the video below, Allen has more than stats in mind. He grew up in a tough situation.His mother had a string of abusive relationships that brought many challenges to the house. That resulted in a lot of anger in his life which on one hand, led him to football, but on the other hand, still had to be dealt with. Dealing with is led him to Jesus, who changed his life. These days, Allen, motivated by his hard upbringing, works with youth and advocates against domestic abuse.

My takeaway from Allen’s story:

Trade – The video talks about trading anger for forgiveness and grace. A change in his life is what allowed him to work through the anger and on to something more productive. We can all learn this lesson too. We all have things that we are holding on to, things that can block us from letting the true light of God shine through us. I pray that we can identify those things and allow God to work them out in our lives.

Chiefs Punter Dustin Colquitt

Kansas City Chiefs – Dustin Colquitt P

A few years back, I wrote a post on Dustin’s brother Britton who played at the time with the Denver Broncos. I wrote that post before the Super Bowl 38, which they lost. Britton would be a member of the Broncos team that won Super Bowl 50, so he did get his ring. And the Colquitt’s dad Craig won 2 Super Bowls as a punter with the Pittsburgh Steelers. Will this be Dustin’s year?  Today will determine whether the Patriots or Chiefs move on to Super Bowl 53.

Dustin was drafted by the Chiefs in the third round of the 2005 draft. He is now in his 14th season with Kansas City and has been named to 2 Pro Bowls in his career. He is the Chiefs nominee for the Walter Payton Man of the Year award this season. He is very active in the community representing Fuel Up to Play 60 and Team Smile as well as Fellowship of Christian Athletes and Athletes in Action. He and his brother and father have also started the First Family of Fourth Down Scholarship Fund at the University of Tennessee.

But beyond punting, Craig Colquitt has instilled a love of God and a desire to serve others in his sons. Dustin says “Even though my dad played professionally, he just wanted us to be happy,” says Colquitt. “He was always more concerned with us having a relationship with Jesus Christ and how we treated others.”

He goes on to say “In society, being a football player is probably the most important thing, but to God it isn’t. I only play football for seven minutes each season, but it’s an earthly platform that God is using to spread His Word. To me that’s cooler than any punt I’ll ever make.”

Here are my takeaways from Colquitt’s story:

Platform – A punter is not the most involved, active member of the team. As Dustin says, he only accounts for about 7 minutes of action each season. But he has used that role to gain a platform to make a difference in many different areas, from dental care and healthy eating to sharing his faith in God, Dustin shows the importance that God plays in his life but taking opportunities to share. What are the opportunities that we have to share God’s importance in our life? Are we making the most of those opportunities? Let’s step up!