Tangible Truths from a Radical Jesus – Zacchaeus

Tuesday night, I posted article number 400 in the life of Living Up to My Name. I really enjoy sharing stories from Christian Athletes, their stories have helped me find a point of interest in pretty much any sporting event that I watch. It is fun to share my passion for sports through these “Heroes in the Game, Heroes in Life”.

But now having reached the 400 post milestone, it is time to change things up a little bit. Not only will I be sharing stories of Christian Athletes, I also want to share some bible stories that I have enjoyed sharing with kids. The focus of these, initially, will be to look at the familiar words Jesus spoke during his time of ministry. Many of these stories, I had heard countless times, but recently I began to notice that what He said was earth-shatteringly radical. Why would he say such seemingly crazy things? Is what He said true? If so, what can we takeaway from these radical truths. So, my friends, consider this an invitation to look with new eyes at some of the familiar passages from the Gospels. Lets allow ourselves to really be WOW-ed by Jesus teaching. The goal will be to look at them with proper perspective and gain a new, deeper level of understanding who Jesus is and who He calls us to be. I present to you. “Tangible Truths from a Radical Jesus”

I will start with the familiar story of Zacchaeus found in Luke 19.1-10.

What do we learn about Zacchaeus? First, we learn a little about what he was – a tax collector and a rich man. Next we learn what he was not – tall or popular. I imagine the gathering crowd not being willing to move aside and let little Zacchaeus through. They may have used this opportunity to take a swing at him, who knows. You see, he was a tax collector, but he was also a Jew. That means he was largely seen as a traitor. Someone who took money from his own people and paid it (at least “most” of it) to Rome to stay in good graces with this enemy regime that had taken over Israel. Tax collectors were also known to pad the numbers a little so they could keep some for themselves. That is likely how Zacchaeus became rich. So there was not a lot of love for him on that day when Jesus was reportedly coming to Jericho.

So Zacchaeus runs ahead of the crowd and he climbs a tree. He is motivated to see the Jesus that so many have been talking about. Motivated enough to put in the extra effort to see Jesus. And along comes Jesus and his entourage. We are not sure exactly what Zacchaeus hopes to achieve in seeing Jesus in person, we just know he climbed a tree. Jesus knew it too, and as he reached that spot, he said “Zacchaeus, come down! I must stay at your house today” (vs 5). You can almost hear the audible gasp from the crowd. The bible says “they grumbled”. They were upset because Jesus was going to visit this “sinner”. ‘Why him?’ I’m sure they asked each other.

But Jesus knew. He said “I came to seek the lost”

And Zacchaeus? He was a changed man. He vowed then and there to repay 4 times all he had collected dishonestly. He also vowed to give half of what he owned to the poor. And Jesus declared that Salvation had come to Zacchaeus’ house today.

What “tangible truths” can we take from this passage?

1- Jesus knew Zacchaeus – We don’t know about their relationship – if this was the first time they had met or not, but we do know that Jesus calle Zacchaeus by name. Undoubtedly, He knew all about Zacchaeus’ shady dealings and dishonesty. But it didn’t scare Jesus off. Instead, it allowed him an opportunity to show grace and change Zacchaeus’ life – which brings me to #2.

2- Meeting Jesus changes lives – Zacchaeus was curious about Jesus. He had heard enough to motivate him to check it out. But when he met Jesus face to face, everything changed. That is the power of Jesus. He realized his sinfulness and was convicted to make things right again.

3- Jesus sees potential – Jesus forgave Zacchaeus’ life of sin. The crowd was not so forgiving. They saw the sin, the problems he had created. Jesus saw a sinful man realize his sinfulness and looked to change. I see a lot of my story in Zacchaeus’ story. I know the things that I have done wrong and I understand the penalty I deserve for those things. But Jesus sees the potential in me. He has a plan for me and that plan is for his purposes. So often, we act like the rest of the crowd. We pass our own judgements on others and write people off if they hurt us once or twice. I’m glad that God doesn’t write us off and I am challenged to see people as God sees them, not as I see them. He loves them, so should we.

christop

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